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Common Names Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa Lesser ʻAkialoa Hookbill (...See More)
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Previous Extinction 59 of 178 Next Extinction
Category Known By Museum Specimens


Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
(Hemignathus obscurus)
[Extinct]


1 Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
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2 Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
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3 Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
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4 Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
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5 Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
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6 Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
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All images shown here are in the public domain because its copyright has expired.
(Unless otherwise stated)

Taxonomy & Status

Common Names

Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa
Lesser ʻAkialoa
Hookbilled Green Creeper

Conservation status

Extinct - last seen 1940

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Drepanidinae
Genus: Hemignathus
Species: H. obscurus

Binomial name

Hemignathus obscurus

Synonyms

Certhia obscura
Akialoa obscura
Akialoa obscurus

    
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Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa

Try searching for: hemignathus obscurus 

Citation: Godino, F.M.J. (). Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa extinct-website.com & co.uk .Downloaded on .
Disclaimer:To make use of this information shown on this page, please check the Conditions of use.
Feedback:Questions, suggestions or do you see any error? Contact us.
Brief Summary

The Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa (Hemignathus obscurus) was a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It was endemic to Hawaii. It became extinct due to habitat loss. It is also commonly called Lesser Akialoa, but this name dates back to the time when all small ʻakialoas were united in this taxon. The Hawaii Akialoa is the other species of bird on Hawai’i to disappear during this time period. It disappeared at around the same time as its Oahu cousin. It was a yellowish bird with a long two inch long, thin whitish-yellow bill. It had small olive green wings which it used to flit from tree to tree to look for insects like beatles and caterpillars. It was seen gleaning the trees in search of insects. The bill of the Akialoa was also designed for more than bug extraction. The Akialoa also fed on nectar in the flowers of lobelias and O’hia blossoms. Its long bill could easily fit into petals of long flowers and took pollen from flower to flower on its forehead. It was collected at several places. It was once thought to be the same species as the Maui and Oahu form, but when specimens were compared all together the scientist saw that all three were different species. Even at the beginning the Kauai Akialoa was a separate species because of its larger size and its brown color. The Hawaiian form was the smallest of the four forms. With the loss of the trees and the flowers, the bird had no shelter or food and disappeared in the year of 1940.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details.

These pages may be of interest?
Maui Nui Greater ʻAkialoa
Maui Nui Greater ʻAkialoa
Hoopoe-billed ʻAkialoa'
Hoopoe-billed ʻAkialoa'
Oʻahu Greater ʻAkialoa
Oʻahu Greater ʻAkialoa
Kauaʻi Greater 'Akialoa
Kauaʻi Greater 'Akialoa
Giant ʻAkialoa
Giant ʻAkialoa

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Museum specimens records

NCB Naturalis, National Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 9517, 2300 RA, Leiden, The Netherlands.

© Reproduced by kind permission of National Museum of Natural History Naturalis, Leiden, Netherlands.
Now part of NCB naturalis - Netherlands Centre for Biodiversity Naturalis

1. RMNH 110.013: Hawaii. Cabinet Temminck, 1820 (bought at auction Bullock Museum, 1819).

2. RMNH 110.014: juvenile, male. Kau, Hawaii Island, Hawaii, June 1895. Collector: Perkins; Donator: A. Newton, Cambridge, 1901.

Remark: Most skins of Drepanididae in Naturalis were collected by Robert Perkins, a British ornithologist who lived on Hawai'i. They were donated to the museum on 13 February 1901 by Alfred Newton, chairman of “the joint commitee appointed by the Royal Society and British Association for Zoology of the Hawaiian Islands”. The donation existed of 19 skins and one nest. According to Newton it was a very valuable collection. In fact worth at least £ 30 ! The accompanying letter testifies the importance of the donation. Newton writes to Otto Finsch, curator of birds at the museum: "I hope the Birds will be appreciated, as I am sure they will be by you, as you are aware of the fact that the whole indigenous Fauna of the Islands is doomed to extinction, even the insects are rapidly disappearing ("Yes! and even the Landshells!!"). I do not say this to enhance the value of one little collection, but in the interest of science, that all possible care may be taken to keep the specimens for posteriority. Of some of these species I am confident it will never be in anybody's power to obtain more specimens. On the Island of Oahu Mr. Perkins estimates that one half of the species of birds originally inhabiting it, are already extinct, and some which were fairly common, are now hardly to be found, so rapid has been the change." Newton's pessimism proved to be justified. Around 1900 the Hawaii Mamo Drepanis pacifica, the Kona Grosbeak Chloridops kona, the nominate race of the Oahu Nukupuu Hemignathus lucidus lucidus and all forms of the Akialoa with the exception of the Greater (Kauai) Akialoa, Hemignatus ellisianus stejnegeri, were extinct. The Kauai Akialoa was last seen in the 1960s and is now also considered extinct.

Peabody Museum of Natural History - Yale University, 170 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511-8902, United States.

Hemignathus obscurus (Gmelin, 1788)

3. YPM ORN 011847, SKIN; male; skin, round; collected from Kaiwiki, Hawaii by H. W. Henshaw. 12 Feb 1900.

Reference: Yale Peabody Museum - Ornithology - Online Catalog

Images Gallery
All images shown here are in the public domain because its copyright has expired.
(Unless otherwise stated)

Hawaiʻi ʻAkialoa (Hemignathus obscurus) (Plate 28) Painted by William Ellis while accompanying Captain James Cook on his third voyage (1776-78).

A general synopsis of birds, Volume I, Part II.
By John Latham.
Published in 1782.

Oiseaux dorés ou à reflets métalliques.
Histoire naturelle et générale des grimpereaux et des oiseaux de paradis.
Written by J.B. Audebert & L.P. Vieillot.
Part II, 1802

The book of nature:
embracing a condensed survey of the animal kingdom as well as sketches of vegetable, anatomy, geology, botany, mineralogy
Written by S. C. Atkinson.
Volume I, 1834.

Illustation from Wilson & Evans' "Aves Hawaiiensis" by Frederick W. Frohawk (1861-1946).

Illustration from Avifauna of Laysan
by Lionel Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild (8 February 1868 – 27 August 1937)
by John Gerrard Keulemans (1842-1912) (Dutch bird illustrator), which was issued from 1893--1900.

PDF Gallery

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* A general synopsis of birds, Volume I, Part II.
By John Latham.
Published in 1782. PDF abstract text

* Oiseaux dorés ou à reflets métalliques.
Histoire naturelle et générale des grimpereaux et des oiseaux de paradis.
Written by J.B. Audebert & L.P. Vieillot.
Part II, 1802. (In French) PDF abstract text

* General zoology or, Systematic natural history.
Vol. VIII. Part I. Aves.
By George Shaw.
Published in 1811. PDF abstract text

* The book of nature: embracing a condensed survey of the animal kingdom as well as sketches of vegetable, anatomy, geology, botany, mineralogy
Written by S. C. Atkinson.
Volume I, 1834. PDF abstract text

* Remarks on the Avifauna of the Sandwich Islands.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. I. Third Series 1871. PDF fulltext

* On recent Additions to our Knowledge of the Avifauna of the Sandwich Islands.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. III. Fourth Series 1879. PDF fulltext

* Catalogue of the Birds in the British Museum.
TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY) LONDON.
VOLUME X, 1885 PDF abstract text

* On some of the Birds of the Sandwich Islands.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. II. 1890. SIXTH SERIES PDF abstract text

* On some of the Birds of the Sandwich Islands.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. II. 1890. SIXTH SERIES PDF fulltext

* Wilson and Evans's ' Aves Hawaiienses '.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. IV. Sixth Series 1892. PDF fulltext

* Notes on Collecting in Kona, Hawaii.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. V. Sixth Series 1893. PDF fulltext

* Rothschild on the Avifauna of Laysan.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. VI. Sixth Series 1894. PDF fulltext

* An Introduction to the Study of the Drepanididae, a Family of Birds peculiar to the Hawaiian Islands.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. I. Eighth Series 1901. PDF fulltext

* Notes on some Hawaiian Birds.
THE IBIS, QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.
VOL. II. Eleventh Series 1920. PDF fulltext

* Recent Records of Some Hawaiian Honeycreepers.
Condor
Vol. 55, No. 4, July-August, 1953. PDF fulltext

* History of endemic Hawaiian birds. Introduction.
Avian History Report
, March 1979. PDF fulltext

* History of endemic Hawaiian birds: specimens in museum collections.
Avian History Report
, July 1979. PDF fulltext

* History of endemic Hawaiian birds: Part I: species accounts: forest birds: 'Akialoa, Nukupu'u & 'Akiapōlā'au.
Avian History Report
, November 1984. PDF fulltext

* Nomenclature Of The Hawaiian Akialoas And Nukupuus (Aves, Drepanidini).
Proceedings of The Biological Society of Washington.
108:373-387 (1995). PDF fulltext

References

* BirdLife International 2008. Hemignathus obscurus . In: IUCN 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 10 January 2010.

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